Happiness shouldn’t hinge on cameras

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Veronica De La Cruz

Armed with Wi-Fi and some of the best high-resolution cameras around, college students roam around campus Snapchatting, Instagramming and Facebooking content in order for their followers to consider them fun or exciting.

It makes sense — keeping followers interested is the point of social media. If one doesn’t have a photo or video to prove that something happened, does that mean it didn’t occur?

Absolutely not, which is one reason why I think Millennials are too dependent on technology. Instead of internalizing and remembering events like people used to do, we now rely on the pictures on our profiles to tell the story.

I started the “100 Happy Days” challenge two weeks ago.This challenge requires me to capture and post a photo of a happy moment everyday. However, I’ve realized that even when I forget to upload the image on Twitter daily, I’m not less happy or appreciative of that moment.

As beneficial as I find these social media tools, I do think it’s important to still live in the moment and not always have to worry about letting others see it.

I guess now I have a better understanding of why 71% of the people who attempt “100 Happy Days” will fail.

I’m not saying we should all stop using Snapchat, Instagram and Twitter. I know I’ll still find myself scrolling through selfies and stories.

Instead, the next time I come across something that makes me happy that day, I’ll focus on enjoying that moment. And if I’m the only person who sees it, that won’t mean that I didn’t experience it.

According to the rules of the “100 Happy Days” challenge, I’ve already failed, but in my book, I’ve just started winning. Isn’t that all that matters?

Veronica De La Cruz can be reached at [email protected] or @Veronica_dlc on Twitter.