The Orion

Modern culture romanticizes prescription pills

Katelyn Martin

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Illustration by Adriana Macias Photo credit: Adriana Macias

Prescription pills are over-romanticized in modern culture through popular music and social media platforms such as Tumblr and Instagram.

There are photos of handfuls of pills and glitter and poems about the use of drugs that grace Tumblr dashboards with the words “beautiful” and “tragic” hovering around them.

The idea that the same drugs that kill tens of thousands of people every year are still being placed in the category as something to be celebrated is concerning for younger generations.

Young girls and boys, many of whom are depressed and using the Internet as an escape, are seeing these images associated with drugs and thinking that it is something they should be doing.

Medical marijuana, in contrast to pills, is not nearly as addictive, dangerous or illegal. Many are opting for the calming affects of marijuana.

However, the drugs that parents are feeding their children from a young age to battle ADD, ADHD, anxiety and other ailments is not helpful for these kids to be able to rely on drugs in the future.

One major celebrity death caused by drugs and highly romanticized by young fans was that of Amy Winehouse. It was not beautiful; her death was tragic and heartbreaking for her friends, family and fans.

Artists like Lana Del Rey and Halsey capture this and casually talk about getting high and taking pills to escape their problems in their music.

The use of prescription pills is no laughing matter. While the threat of overdoses and physical implications may hover above a user’s head, the reliance and continuation of use throughout someone’s life can lead to their downfall.

I, personally, have seen the effects that the abuse of pills has on families. It leaves empty promises and broken hearts.

Popping valium or morphine to make it through your day is not glamorous. Coming down is not beautiful. Watching a parent go through this is not something to be wished upon anyone.

Getting physically sick and having erratic behavior is not something to be romanticized, and being addicted to something that is killing its user should not be made out to be something that it is not.

Getting a hold of prescriptions may be easier than ever, but the price paid for escaping a few problems or trying to look cool is not worth the trouble, heartbreak or inevitable death.

Katelyn Martin can be reached at [email protected] or @katelynmmartin_ on Twitter.

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Modern culture romanticizes prescription pills