School admission scandal

Janette Estrada

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






We get it, you’re rich.

Don’t worry princess, Mommy and Daddy will handle it…as always.

It’s now been a week since news broke of the college admission scandal that confirmed wealthy families can cheat their way through life.

The scandal, nicknamed “Operation varsity blues,” is now the biggest college admissions scam. It involved 50 people and consisted of two major elements:

Cheating on standardized tests (particularly SAT)

Bribing college coaches to accept students as college athletes

This was done in exchange for a “small donation” of $15,000 to $75,000 paid by students’ parents. No biggie.

The mastermind behind the scandal is William Rick Singer, CEO of The Key, a non-profit college admissions prep company. The company claimed the large amounts of money flowing in were donations to his foundation aimed at helping poor students.

To those involved: I’m sorry your parents felt the need to buy your spot in class because they did not deem you smart enough. It must be rewarding to know your method of winning is planted on cheat codes.

Yeah sure, money buys it all, but it can’t buy brains. You are a slave to capitalistic greed.

College is expensive; an uphill financial battle for minorities. College entrance exams and applications are not free. They have costs that many can’t afford.

So you mean to tell me that instead of actually helping the students who put effort into their education are being belittled by elite nobodies whose kids care little to nothing about school? Thank you.

Talk about bad parenting. Your kids are a waste of space for students who put in work and earned their spot at the university.

Take Olivia Jade, daughter of Full House celebrity Lori Loughlin, “I do want the experience of like game days, partying…I don’t really care about school as you guys all know,” she said.

Universities are meant to be institutions of higher education. Yet, by accepting bribes and allowing these kids to be enrolled, they’ve shown their main priority is to make a profit rather than promote education and academic growth.

Not only should the admission staff be fired, but the universities as a whole should be held accountable.

I cannot imagine how easy it must be to have the financial stability to not have to worry about expenses, let alone being raised on a pedestal.

They say parents will do anything for their children, but I wonder if it was worth risking a criminal trial for getting their kids into a prestigious university.

Janette Estrada can be reached at [email protected] or @Jane_11e on Twitter.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email