The Orion

To be or not to be, financially stable

Janette Estrada

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Dear financial aid,

I am writing a hate letter to you today.

I am writing this letter because for the past three years I have been denied my qualifications. Not to say I am desperate, but I have bit my tongue for too long. It is time I confess my sincere acrimony towards you, financial aid.

For some, a money aid makes postsecondary education possible, as well as allowing them to attend a university that would otherwise be unreachable. Or the most commonly known reason: reducing the price of an education they would otherwise simply pay without assistance.

According to CollegeBoard statistics, “In 2017-18, undergraduate and graduate students received a total of $241.3 billion in student aid in the form of grants from all sources, Federal Work-Study (FWS), federal loans, and federal tax credits and deductions.”

This is great until I hear about students who like to take advantage of you.

Did you know your sudden cash flow is tempting for irresponsible spenders?

During my first year of college, news went around about a student who enrolled in community college for money aid. After failing his classes this student was expelled, but received no punishment for the fraud. Instead, he walked away with free money.

There is no proper way to monitor spending by students and the feeling is aggravating.

Financial aid, you suck for giving out money to the wrong people. You should look for a more inclusive plan that benefits students who place importance on their education. For example, me.

Just think about how lame this sounds: Congrats Janette, you got a full run to college paid for by your parents!

Not only this but skipping class? I think not. I cannot afford these luxuries.

University student, Jesus Espinoza, expresses his opinion on the matter.

“Not getting financial aid is a good thing because It shows that your parents make your money,” Espinoza said. “I pretty much get paid to go to college.”

Money does not grow on trees. My parents are not my personal bank. I would love to know how working full-time is going to pay off being a full-time student with no financial aid. If you have any suggestions besides loans that will deepen my debt, please send them my way.

Instead of feeling proud of my parents’ hard work, school leaves me feeling guilty. Without you, I feel punished.

But, there is one thing all students have in common: books.

For those of you with financial aid, get a glimpse of those who struggle. You complain about books being expensive, but forget there are others with bigger money signs tagged on our foreheads.

Every choice I make jeopardizes my stance in school.

I need relief. My parents need relief. You should not be a reward for those who do not care. School should not have to feel like a rich man’s world.

Money should not have to put my education on the line.

Financial Aid, if you are reading this, holla at your girl.

Janette Estrada can be reached at [email protected] or @Jane_11e on Twitter.

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To be or not to be, financially stable