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The Orion

California’s dreaming

Alex Horne

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Almost immediately after Donald Trump was elected president there were groups advocating for California to secede from the union, dubbed “Calexit.”

Although we are majority not in favor of Trump, we simply cannot get on board with the notion of a secession.

At first, the idea sounds appealing, after all, California would have almost everything it needs to function as a very prosperous country.

The country of California would boast the world’s sixth largest economy, the technological and entertainment capitals of the world and a thriving agricultural scene that provides over half of the United States fruit and nut supply.

Although California alone has a lot to offer, the argument to remain in the union is much stronger than that to leave.

To begin, it is against federal law to secede from the union due to Texas v. White which cites it as unconstitutional.

California would also lose access to federal protection from the United States Military. Sure it would probably create its own military, but it would likely never compare in power. In addition, it would have to negotiate temporary protections from The United States for the period after the secession.

California would also be cut off from every diplomatic relation The United States has made. California would have to create its own federal government which would take generous amounts of time and money.

This doesn’t even take into consideration how the federal government would react. It is unknown what consequences the U.S. could inflict on California if it were to secede.

Although California is abundant in resources, in the past few years it has lacked water.

California’s water is quickly running low. The question of where the independent country of California would get its water would be crucial. If, or more likely when, California runs out of water it would have to import water from The U.S., which could prove difficult.

Although California overwhelmingly did not vote for Trump, it doesn’t mean it should give up on the country. Calexit may seem like a good way to throw the middle finger up at Washington, but it is a flawed plan with too many drawbacks.

Californians must remember that even under Trump, the state will still remain a stronghold of progressiveness, innovation and inclusiveness. The California spirit remains alive and well and there is nothing the president-elect can do that will take that away.

 

 

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The student news site of California State University, Chico
California’s dreaming